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December 20, 2017

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Brilliant points. Hopefully someone is listening.
Let Us hope that someone will bring John Clifford’s Casablanca somewhere far away to keep him preoccupied and away from once again making NYCB unwatchable.

Thanks, Not another review...

I don't doubt that Martins is a tough boss who pushes people's buttons in addition to pushing them around. So did Jack Welch of GE. So did Larry Ellison of Oracle. So did Steve Jobs.

Here's an interesting perspective on why people should want to work for the toughest bosses: https://www.monster.com/career-advice/article/super-tough-boss

"To my surprise, however, some of these successful bosses were not so warm and fuzzy. They were what most of us would label a bastard—maybe not so bad as Miranda Priestly, but close. They rode their protégés hard, critiqued their performance mercilessly, and ranted and raved when their protégés made the slightest mistake. They gave employees every reason in the world to hate them, except one: They put their careers in overdrive. For protégés, a few years working for one of these bosses made the difference between a middling career and one that was truly spectacular. For that reason, these bosses weren’t really bastards. They were tough, and working for them was an everyday challenge. They were another breed of boss entirely, one that I fondly like to call Glorious Bastards.

Oracle founder Larry Ellison is the Glorious Bastard incarnate. Although Ellison often discussed the importance of chemistry and teamwork, he led more by intimidation and was known for fostering a brutal, ultra-competitive environment."

Agree with all your points on Macaulay. And, per usual, he waxes on in his verbose manner via Instagram post. What I find most notable there are the comments and likes. Scroll through, and one will find one very prominent principal ballerina name.

It's foolish not to keep an arm's length from him.

I can't wait until the New York Times is shut down. Because it will be. Very soon.

hi Haglund,

Are you already aware of Gomes's resignation?

http://www.dancemagazine.com/marcelo-gomes-just-resigned-from-abt-2519159661.html

How awful.

Did you see the news about Marcelo? I am devastated.

Saddened about Marcelo’s resignation. Curious about the alleged misconduct.

We don't know the details and perhaps never will. We don't even know if this matter was brought to ABT's attention by a 3rd party or an immediate party or whether anyone is claiming to be a victim.

If Marcelo resigned because he felt that he was not treated with the fairness and respect that he deserved once ABT's investigation clearly showed that no one in the ABT "community" was involved, then that is a tragedy, too. I would expect/hope that other dancers in the company also would resign in protest.

It would seem that alleged misconduct that doesn't rise to the level of alleged illegal misconduct is a matter of violation of a company's expectation for its employees' behavior. But we're in a climate at the moment where there is a lot of implied blackmail that if companies don't jump through hoops and shoot (the employee) from the hip, then the matter turns up as fodder for NYT or WP who are continually on a hunt for online clicks, no matter how they can get them. So, basically the companies' investigations are to prevent them from losing money due to bad press about an employee's behavior. The NYT itself has declined to make the results of its investigations of its own employees public and has cited them as "personnel matters." But that doesn't stop them from trying to argue that other companies "personnel matters" should be made public via its pages.

Already Macaulay is salivating and painting broad brush strokes about the many others who are coming to the NYT with their stories instead of going to the police or a lawyer. He has become quite the cheery cheerleader of these stories which are making NYT and WP extra money.

And still, NYT seemingly has no interest in examining Macaulay's paedophilia-related arrest and jailing.

Well, well, well. Macaulay removed the I-gram photo of ABT's press release and all the comments including his own grossly reckless and negligent assertion that ABT gave Marcelo an option to resign.

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